Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 15:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Chenchen Mou , UCLA , muchenchen@math.ucla.edu , Organizer: Yao Yao
The talk is about a stochastic representation formula for the viscosity solution of Dirichlet terminal-boundary value problem for a degenerate Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman integro-partial differential equation in a bounded domain. We show that the unique viscosity solution is the value function of the associated stochastic optimal control problem. We also obtain the dynamic programming principle for the associated stochastic optimal control problem in a bounded domain. This is a joint work with R. Gong and A. Swiech.
Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Joseph Teran , UCLA Math , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
Simulation of hyperelastic materials is widely adopted in the computer graphics community for applications that include virtual clothing, skin, muscle, fat, etc. Elastoplastic materials with a hyperelastic constitutive model combined with a notion of stress constraint (or feasible stress region) are also gaining increasing applicability in the field. In these models, the elastic potential energy only increases with the elastic partof the deformation decomposition. The evolution of the plastic part is designed to satisfy the stress constraint. Perhaps the most common example of this phenomenon is denting of an elastic shell. However, other very powerful examples include frictional contact material interactions. I will discuss some of the mathematical aspects of these models and present some recent results and examples in computer graphics applications.
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 18:00 , Location: Room 1005, Roger A. and Helen B. Krone Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB) , Joseph M. Teran , UCLA Math , Organizer: Sung Ha Kang
New applications of scientific computing for solid and fluid mechanics problems include simulation of virtual materials in movie special effects and virtual surgery. Both disciplines demand physically realistic dynamics for materials like water, smoke, fire, and soft tissues. New algorithms are required for each area. Teran will speak about the simulation techniques required in these fields and will share some recent results including: simulated surgical repair of biomechanical soft tissues; extreme deformation of elastic objects with contact; high resolution incompressible flow; and clothing and hair dynamics. He will also discuss a new algorithm used for simulating the dynamics of snow in Disney’s animated feature film, “Frozen”.More information at https://www.math.gatech.edu/hg/item/594422
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 13:55 , Location: Skiles 005 , Prof. Nathan Kutz , University of Washington, Applied Mathematics , Organizer: Martin Short
The emergence of data methods for the sciences in the last decade has been enabled by the plummeting costs of sensors, computational power, and data storage. Such vast quantities of data afford us new opportunities for data-driven discovery, which has been referred to as the 4th paradigm of scientific discovery. We demonstrate that we can use emerging, large-scale time-series data from modern sensors to directly construct, in an adaptive manner, governing equations, even nonlinear dynamics, that best model the system measured using modern regression techniques. Recent innovations also allow for handling multi-scale physics phenomenon and control protocols in an adaptive and robust way. The overall architecture is equation-free in that the dynamics and control protocols are discovered directly from data acquired from sensors. The theory developed is demonstrated on a number of canonical example problems from physics, biology and engineering.
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 13:55 , Location: Skiles 006 , Michael Landry , Yale , michael.landry@yale.edu , Organizer: Balazs Strenner
Let M be a closed hyperbolic 3-manifold with a fibered face \sigma of the unit ball of the Thurston norm on H_2(M). If M satisfies a certain condition related to Agol’s veering triangulations, we construct a taut branched surface in M spanning \sigma. This partially answers a 1986 question of Oertel, and extends an earlier partial answer due to Mosher. I will not assume knowledge of the Thurston norm, branched surfaces, or veering triangulations.
Monday, September 18, 2017 - 12:30 , Location: Skiles 006 , Livia Corsi , Georgia Institute of Technology , lcorsi6@math.gatech.edu , Organizer: Livia Corsi
  I will consider the isotropic XY quantum chain with a transverse magnetic field acting on a single site and analyze the long time behaviour of the time-dependent state of the system when a periodic perturbation drives the impurity. It has been shown in the early 70’s that, in the thermodynamic limit, the state of such system obeys a linear time-dependent Schrodinger equation with a memory term. I will consider two different regimes, namely when the perturbation has non-zero or zero average, and I will show that if the magnitute of the potential is small enough then for large enough frequencies the state approaches a periodic orbit synchronized with the potential. Moreover I will provide the explicit rate of convergence to the asymptotics. This is a joint work with G. Genovese. 
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Tom Trotter , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Lutz Warnke
The original concept ofdimension for posets was formulatedby Dushnik and Miller in 1941 and hasbeen studied extensively in the literature.Over the years, a number of variant formsof dimension have been proposed withvarying degrees of interest and application.However, in the recent past, two variantshave received extensive attention.  Theyare Boolean dimension and local dimension.This is the first of two talks on these twoconcepts, with the second talk givenby Heather Smith.  In this talk, wewill introduce the two parameters and providemotivation for their study.  We will alsogive some concrete examples andprove some basic inequalities.This is joint work with a GeorgiaTech team in which my colleaguesare Fidel Barrera-Cruz, Tom Prag,Heather Smith and Libby Taylor.
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 154 , Jiaqi Yang , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Jiaqi Yang
We will introduce Arnold diffusion in Mather's setting. There are many advances toward proof of this. In particular, we will study an approach based on recent work of Marian-Gidea and Jean-Pierre Marco.
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 13:55 , Location: Skiles 006 , Peter Lambert-Cole , Georgia Institute of Technology , Organizer: Peter Lambert-Cole
In this series of talks, I will introduce basic concepts and results in singularity theory of smooth and holomorphic maps.  In the first talk, I will present a gentle introduction to the elements of singularity theory and give a proof of the well-known Morse Lemma that illustrates key geometric and algebraic principles of singularity theory.
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 13:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Peng Zhang , Computer Science, Georgia Tech , zpeng91@gmail.com , Organizer: He Guo
In this talk, we study solvers for geometrically embedded graph structured block linear systems. The general form of such systems, PSD-Graph-Structured Block Matrices (PGSBM), arise in scientific computing, linear elasticity, the inner loop of interior point algorithms for linear programming, and can be viewed as extensions of graph Laplacians into multiple labels at each graph vertex. Linear elasticity problems, more commonly referred to as trusses, describe forces on a geometrically embedded object.We present an asymptotically faster algorithm for solving linear systems in well-shaped 3-D trusses. Our algorithm utilizes the geometric structures to combine nested dissection and support theory, which are both well studied techniques for solving linear systems. We decompose a well-shaped 3-D truss into balanced regions with small boundaries, run Gaussian elimination to eliminate the interior vertices, and then solve the remaining linear system by preconditioning with the boundaries.On the other hand, we prove that the geometric structures are ``necessary`` for designing fast solvers. Specifically, solving linear systems in general trusses is as hard as solving general linear systems over the real. Furthermore, we give some other PGSBM linear systems for which fast solvers imply fast solvers for general linear systems.Based on the joint works with Robert Schwieterman and Rasmus Kyng.

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