Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Gene Kopp , University of Michigan , gkopp@umich.edu , Organizer:
Linear wave solutions to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation with periodic boundary conditions have two physical interpretations: Rossby (atmospheric) waves, and drift (plasma) waves in a tokamak. These waves display resonance in triads. In the case of infinite Rossby deformation radius, the set of resonant triads may be described as the set of integer solutions to a particular homogeneous Diophantine equation, or as the set of rational points on a projective surface. We give a rationalparametrization of the smooth points on this surface, answering the question: What are all resonant triads, and how may they be enumerated quickly? We also give a fiberwise description, yielding an algorithmic procedure to answer the question: For fixed $r \in \Q$, what are all wavevectors $(x,y)$ that resonate with a wavevector $(a,b)$ with $a/b = r$?
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Prof. Joe Viola , University of Nantes, France , Organizer:
Abstract: Abstract: Let p(x,xi) be a complex-valued polynomial of degree 2 on R^{2n}, and let P be the corresponding non-self-adjoint Weyl quantization. We will discuss some results on the relationship between the classical Hamilton flow exp(H_p) and the L^2 operator theory for the Schrödinger evolution exp(-iP), under a positivity condition of Melin and Sjöstrand.
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, November 8, 2016 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Prof. Mihai Tohaneanu , University of Kentucky , mihaitohy@googlemail.com , Organizer:
We study the quasilinear wave equation $\Box_{g} u = 0$, where the metric $g$ depends on $u$ and equals the Schwarzschild metric when u is identically 0. Under a couple of assumptions on the metric $g$ near the trapped set and the light cone, we prove global existence of solutions. This is joint work with Hans Lindblad.
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Prof. Anne-Sophie de Suzzoni , University Paris XIII , annso.ds@gmail.com , Organizer:
This talk is about the Dirac equation. We consider an electron modeled by awave function and evolving in the Coulomb field generated by a nucleus. Ina very rough way, this should be an equation of the form$$i\partial_t u = -\Delta u + V( \cdot - q(t)) u$$where $u$ represents the electron while $q(t)$ is the position of thenucleus. When one considers relativitic corrections on the dynamics of anelectron, one should replace the Laplacian in the equation by the Diracoperator. Because of limiting processes in the chemistry model from whichthis is derived, there is also a cubic term in $u$ as a correction in theequation. What is more, the position of the nucleus is also influenced bythe dynamics of the electron. Therefore, this equation should be coupledwith an equation on $q$ depending on $u$.I will present this model and give the first properties of the equation.Then, I will explain why it is well-posed on $H^2$ with a time of existencedepending only on the $H^1$ norm of the initial datum for $u$ and on theinitial datum for $q$. The linear analysis, namely the properties of thepropagator of the equation $i\partial_t u = D u + V( \cdot - q(t))$ where$D$ is the Dirac operator is based on works by Kato, while the non linearanalysis is based on a work by Cancès and Lebris.It is possible to have more than one nucleus. I will explain why.(Joint work with F. Cacciafesta, D. Noja and E. Séré)
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Prof. Yifeng Yu , Universtiy of California, Irvine , yifengy@uci.edu , Organizer:
A major open problem in periodic homogenization of Hamilton-Jacobi equations is to understand deep properties of the effective Hamiltonian.  In this talk, I will present some related works in both convex and non-convex situations. If time permits,  relevant problems from applications in turbulent combustion and traffic flow will also be discussed.
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, September 20, 2016 - 15:00 , Location: Skiles 006 , Professor Russell Schwab , Michigan State University , rschwab@math.msu.edu , Organizer:
 We investigate Lipschitz maps, I, mapping $C^2(D) \to C(D)$, where $D$ is an appropriate domain. The global comparison principle (GCP) simply states that whenever two functions are ordered in D and touch at a point, i.e. $u(x)\leq v(x)$ for all $x$ and $u(z)=v(z)$ for some $z \in D$, then also the mapping I has the same order, i.e. $I(u,z)\leq I(v,z)$.  It has been known since the 1960’s, by Courr\`{e}ge, that if I is a linear mapping with the GCP, then I must be represented as a linear drift-jump-diffusion operator that may have both local and integro-differential parts.   It has also long been known and utilized that when I is both local and Lipschitz it will be a min-min over linear and local drift-diffusion operators, with zero nonlocal part.  In this talk we discuss some recent work that bridges the gap between these situations to cover the nonlinear and nonlocal setting for the map, I.  These results open up the possibility to study Dirichlet-to-Neumann mappings for fully nonlinear equations as integro-differential operators on the boundary.  This is joint work with Nestor Guillen.
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 15:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Vu Hoang , Rice University , Vu.Hoang@rice.edu , Organizer: Yao Yao
The incompressible three-dimensional Euler equations are a basic model of fluid mechanics. Although these equations are more than 200 years old, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, most notably if smooth solutions can form singularities in finite time. In this talk, I discuss recent progress towards proving a finite time blowup for the Euler equations, inspired numerical work by T. Hou and G. Luo and analytical results by A. Kiselev and V. Sverak. My main focus lies on various model equations of fluid mechanics that isolate and capture possible mechanisms for singularity formation. An important theme is to achieve finite-time blowup in a controlled manner using the hyperbolic flow scenario in one and two space dimensions. This talk is based on joint work with B. Orcan-Ekmecki, M. Radosz, and H. Yang.
Series: PDE Seminar
Friday, April 29, 2016 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Adrian Tudorascu , West Virginia University , Organizer: Wilfrid Gangbo
SGSW is a third level specialization of Navier-Stokes (via Boussinesq, then Semi-Geostrophic), and it accurately describes large-scale, rotation-dominated atmospheric flow under the extra-assumption that the horizontal velocity of the fluid is independent of the vertical coordinate. The Cullen-Purser stability condition establishes a connection between SGSW and Optimal Transport by imposing semi-convexity on the pressure; this has led to results of existence of solutions in dual space (i.e., where the problem is transformed under a non-smooth change of variables). In this talk I will present recent results on existence and weak stability of solutions in physical space (i.e., in the original variables) for general initial data, the very first of their kind. This is based on joint work with M. Feldman (UW-Madison).
Series: PDE Seminar
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 270 , Ioan Bejenaru , University of California, San Diego , Organizer: Wilfrid Gangbo
We establish global well-posedness and scattering for the cubic Dirac equation for small data in the critical space. The theory we develop is the Klein-Gordon counterpart of the Wave Maps / Schroedinger Maps theory. This is joint work with Sebastian Herr.
Series: PDE Seminar
Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 15:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Dejan Slepcev , Carnegie Mellon University , Organizer: Wilfrid Gangbo
We will discuss a distance between shapes defined by minimizing the integral of kinetic energy along transport paths constrained to measures with characteristic-function densities. The formal geodesic equations for this shape distance are Euler equations for incompressible, inviscid flow of fluid with zero pressure and surface tension on the free boundary. We will discuss the instability that the minimization problem develops and the resulting connections to optimal transportation. The talk is based on joint work with Jian-Guo Liu (Duke) and Bob Pego (CMU).

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