Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Series: Other Talks
Monday, February 20, 2017 - 15:00 , Location: Guggenheim Building Room 442 , Rodney L. Anderson , Jet Propulsion Lab. , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
New and proposed interplanetary missions increasingly require the design of trajectories within challenging multi-body environments that stress or exceed the capabilities of the two-body design methodologies typically used over the last several decades. These current methods encounter difficulties because they often require appreciable user interaction, result in trajectories that require significant amounts of propellant, or miss potential mission-enabling options. The use of dynamical systems methods applied to three-body and multi-body models provides a pathway to obtain a fuller theoretical understanding of the problem that can then result in significant improvements to trajectory design in each of these areas. In particular, the computation of periodic Lagrange point and resonant orbits along with their associated invariant manifolds and heteroclinic connections are crucial to finding the dynamical channels that provide new or more optimal solutions. These methods are particularly effective for mission types that include multi-body tours, Earth-Moon transfers, approaches to moons, and trajectories to asteroids. The inclusion of multi-body effects early in the analysis for these applications is key to providing a more complete set of solutions that includes improved trajectories that may otherwise be missed when using two-body methods. This seminar will focus on two representative trajectory design applications that are especially challenging. The first is the design of tours using flybys of planets or moons with a particular emphasis on the Galilean moons and Europa. In this case, the exploration of the design space using the invariant manifolds of resonant and Lyapunov orbits provides information such as the resonance transitions that are required as part of the tour. The second application includes endgame scenarios, which typically involve an approach to a moon with an objective of either capturing into orbit around the moon or landing on the surface. Often, the invariant manifolds of particular orbits may be used in this case to provide a wide set of approach options for both capture and landing analyses. New methods will also be discussed that provide a foundation for rigorously analyzing the transit of trajectories through the libration point regions that is necessary for the approach and capture phase for bodies such as Europa and the Moon. These methods provide a fundamentally new method to search for the invariant manifolds of orbits and hyperbolic invariant sets associated with libration points while giving additional insight into the dynamics of the flow in these regions.
Series: Other Talks
Monday, January 9, 2017 - 09:00 , Location: Klaus 1116 , Various speakers , Various affiliations , Organizer: Robin Thomas
This is a 3-day conference celebrating the 25th anniversary of the ACO Program. For more details about the conference please visit http://aco25.gatech.edu/
Series: Other Talks
Sunday, January 8, 2017 - 09:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Anton Leykin , Georgia Tech , leykin@math.gatech.edu , Organizer: Anton Leykin

Tentative schedule: 9-12: mini-presentations, informal discussion, Q&A, led by Jose Rodriguez (numerical decomposition), Elizabeth Gross (reaction networks), Dan Bates (numerical AG for sciences and engineering); 12-1: lunch; 1pm+: catch flights, continue talking in groups.

This is an informal get-together of the Joint Meetings participants and locals interested in various aspects of Numerical Algebraic Geometry. This area combines numerical analysis and nonlinear algebra in algorithms that found various applications in other parts of mathematics and outside. (If interested in joining, email leykin@math.gatech.edu
Series: Other Talks
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 13:00 , Location: Skiles 005 , Viorel Costeanu , J.P. Morgan , viorel.costeanu@gmail.com , Organizer: Ionel Popescu
1. One day before the election, the statistics site 538 predicted a 70% chance of a Clinton victory. How do we judge the quality of probabilistic prediction models? Ultimately every quant finance model has a probabilistic prediction model at its core, for instance the geometric Brownian Motion is the core of Black-Scholes.  I will explain the Basel Traffic Ligths Framework and then I'll ask the audience to think how the framework can be extended.     2. Multi-factor local volatility. I will explain Dupire's local volatility model and ask how this model can be extended to a multi-factor framework.     3. Model overfitting. There are objective criteria for statistical model overfitting,  such as AIC. Such criteria don't exist for risk-neutral derivatives pricing models.   
Series: Other Talks
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Prasad Tetali , School of Mathematics, Georgia Tech , Organizer:
Series: Other Talks
Saturday, October 8, 2016 - 09:34 , Location: CULC and Skiles , see http://qmath13.gatech.edu/ , various , Organizer:
THis is an international meeting that will take place 8-11 October.  See http://qmath13.gatech.edu/ for more details.
Series: Other Talks
Friday, October 7, 2016 - 14:00 , Location: ES&T L1175 , Peter Hinow , University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee , Organizer: Matt Baker
Series: Other Talks
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 16:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Don Zagier , Max Planck Institute for Mathematics Bonn , don.zagier@mpim-bonn.mpg.de , Organizer: Stavros Garoufalidis
We will describe an etale version of Bloch groups and regulators which for the case of number fields that take values in quotients of units of their rings of integers. Joint work with Frank Calegari and Stavros Garoufalidis
Series: Other Talks
Monday, September 12, 2016 - 16:30 , Location: Skiles 006 , Rafel de la Llave , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Rafael de la Llave
The goal of this group is to read carefully the book "Introduction to Chaos in non-equilibrium stat. Mechanics". There will be several speakers. AThe first lecture will be a quick introduction to thermodynamics and statistical mechanics for mathematicians. We hope to explain the physical basis of the problems to mathematicians who have no background in physics and also cover some of the mathematical  subtleties that are often overlooked in physiscs courses.   
Series: Other Talks
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 11:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Prasad Tetali , School of Mathematics, Georgia Tech , Organizer: Prasad Tetali
All School of Mathematics faculty, staff and postdocs are invited to attend this welcome event which will open with a short presentation and introducing new members to the School. Lunch will be provided.

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