Perturbation Theory and its Application to Complex Biological Networks --A quantification of systematic features of biological networks

Series: 
Dissertation Defense
Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 11:00
2 hours
Location: 
Skiles 006
,  
School of Mathematics, Georgia Tech
The primary objective of this thesis is to make a quantitative study of complex biological networks. Our fundamental motivation is to obtain the statistical dependency between modules by injecting external noise. To accomplish this, a deep study of stochastic dynamical systems would be essential. The first part is about the stochastic dynamical system theory. The classical estimation of invariant measures of Fokker-Planck equations is improved by the level set method. Further, we develop a discrete Fokker-Planck-type equation to study the discrete stochastic dynamical systems. In the second part, we quantify systematic measures including degeneracy, complexity and robustness. We also provide a series of results on their properties and the connection between them. Then we apply our theory to the JAK-STAT signaling pathway network.