Yifan Yang

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Shuting Pan

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Ran Duan

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Jing Jin

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Dhamma Kimpara

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Improv comedy with a science twist!

Scientists, improvisation artists, and the audience combine to show the lighter side of science and life in the lab through short improv games and sketches.

Featuring Georgia Tech mathematician Lew Lefton.

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Location:
Whole World Improv Theater, 1216 Spring Street, Atlanta, 30309

Taste of Science is one of many Georgia Tech events at the 2018 Atlanta Science Festival.

Featuring live demonstrations, food samples, and fascinating facts that tie science, culture, and food together, the Taste of Science is sure to satisfy your appetite for learning.

Hosted by College of Sciences’ Ed Greco, Michael Evans, Jennifer Leavey, Enid Steinbart, and their students in students in the STEMcomm VIP class.

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Georgia Institute of Technology, near Kessler Campanile, 350 Ferst Dr NW, Atlanta, 30332

Thibaud Alemany

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School of Mathematics' 2018 Stelson Lecture, by Jill C. Pipher, Brown University

How is it possible to send encrypted information across an insecure channel (like the internet) so that only the intended recipient can decode it, without sharing the secret key in advance?

In 1976, well before this question arose, a new mathematical theory of encryption (public-key cryptography) invented by Diffie and Hellman made digital commerce and finance possible. The technology advances of the last 20 years bring new and urgent problems, including the need to compute on encrypted data in the cloud and to have cryptography that can withstand the speed-ups of quantum computers.

In this lecture, Jill Pipher will discuss some of the history of cryptography and some of the latest ideas in "lattice" cryptography which, appear to be quantum resistant and efficient 

RECEPTION FOLLOWS THE STELSON LECTURE

About the Speaker

Jill C. Pipher is Vice President for Research and Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor of Mathematics at Brown University. 

She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the president-elect of the American Mathematical Society and the first director of the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research.

Pipher taught at the University of Chicago before taking a position at Brown, where she served as chair of the Mathematics Department from 2005 to 2008.

Her research areas are harmonic analysis, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations, and cryptography. She has published more than 50 research articles and has coauthored a textbook on cryptography. 

Jill Pipher will deliver a colloquium on "Non-Smooth Boundary Value Problems" on Friday, March 2, 2018, 11 AM, in Room 006, Skiles Building, 686 Cherry St NW, Atlanta, GA 30313.

About the Stelson Lecture Series
The series is made possible by an endowment created in 1988 by Thomas Stelson in honor of his father, Hugh Stelson. Thomas Stelson was a distinguished civil engineer who served Georgia Tech in high leadership positions from 1971 to 1990. Hugh Stelson was a mathematician who worked on problems related to interest rates, annuities, and numerical analysis. Lecturers invited for this series are first-rate mathematicians who are gifted speakers. Stelson lecturers give a public lecture for a general audience, as well as a colloquium for mathematicians and experts in related disciplines.   

 

Event Details

Date/Time:

Location:
Room 1443, Klaus Advanced Computing Building, 266 Ferst Dr NW, Atlanta, GA 30332

Jill C. Pipher, Vice President for Research and Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor of Mathematics at Brown University will give the Stelson Lecture at Georgia Tech on March 1, 2018, 6:00-7:00 PM • Klaus Lecture Auditorium 1443, with a reception to follow at 7:00 PM.

See also the CoS story here:

http://www.cos.gatech.edu/hg/item/602067

 

Abstract for Stelson Lecture

How is it possible to send encrypted information across an insecure channel (like the internet) so that only the intended recipient can decode it, without sharing the secret key in advance? In 1976, well before this question arose, a new mathematical theory of encryption (public-key cryptography) was invented by Diffie and Hellman, which made digital commerce and finance possible. The technology advances of the last twenty years bring new and urgent problems, including the need to compute on encrypted data in the cloud and to have cryptography that can withstand the speed-ups of quantum computers. In this lecture, we will discuss some of the history of cryptography, as well as some of the latest ideas in "lattice" cryptography which appear to be quantum resistant and efficient 

There will also be a Colloquium on Friday, March 2, 2018, at 11:00 AM in Skiles room 006.

Title: Non-smooth boundary value problems

The regularity properties of solutions to linear partial differential equations in domains depend on the structure of the equation, the degree of smoothness of the coefficients of the equation, and the boundary of the domain. Quantifying this dependence is a classical problem, and modern techniques can answer some of these questions with remarkable precision. For both physical and theoretical reasons, it is important to consider partial differential equations with non-smooth coefficients. We’ll discuss how some classical tools in harmonic and complex analysis have played a central role in answering questions in this subject at the interface of harmonic analysis and partial differential equations. 

About the speaker:

Jill Pipher is the Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor Mathematics at Brown University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the president-elect of the American Mathematical Society and she was the first director of the Institute for Computational and Experimental Research. She taught at the University of Chicago before taking a position at Brown, where she served as chair of the Mathematics Department from 2005 to 2008. Her work has been in harmonic analysis, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations, and cryptography. She has published more than 50 research articles and has coauthored a textbook on cryptography. 

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Location:
Atlanta, GA

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