Seminars and Colloquia by Series

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Akram Aldroubi , Vanderbilt University , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Catherine Beneteau , University of South Florida , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
Wednesday, August 23, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Joey Iverson , University of Maryland , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Mishko Mitkovskii , Clemson University , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
A well-known elementary linear algebra fact says that any linear independent set of vectors in a finite-dimensional vector space cannot have more elements than any spanning set. One way to obtain an analog of this result in the infinite dimensional setting is by replacing the comparison of cardinalities with a more suitable concept - which is the concept of densities. Basically one needs to compare the cardinalities locally everywhere and then take the appropriate limits. We provide a rigorous way to do this and obtain a universal density theorem that generalizes many classical density results. I will also discuss the connection between this result and the uncertainty principle in harmonic analysis.
Wednesday, April 12, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Eyvi Palsson , Virginia Tech , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
Finding and understanding patterns in data sets is of significant importance in many applications. One example of a simple pattern is the distance between data points, which can be thought of as a 2-point configuration. Two classic questions, the Erdos distinct distance problem, which asks about the least number of distinct distances determined by N points in the plane, and its continuous analog, the Falconer distance problem, explore that simple pattern. Questions similar to the Erdos distinct distance problem and the Falconer distance problem can also be posed for more complicated patterns such as triangles, which can be viewed as 3-point configurations. In this talk I will present recent progress on Falconer type problems for simplices. The main techniques used come from analysis and geometric measure theory.
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Galyna Livshyts , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
It was shown by Keith Ball that the maximal section of an n-dimensional cube is \sqrt{2}. We show the analogous sharp bound for a maximal marginal of a product measure with bounded density. We also show an optimal bound for all k-codimensional marginals in this setting, conjectured by Rudelson and Vershynin. This bound yields a sharp small ball inequality for the length of a projection of a random vector. This talk is based on the joint work with G. Paouris and P. Pivovarov.
Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 02:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Shahaf Nitzan , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
A Gaussian stationary sequence is a random function f: Z --> R, for which any vector (f(x_1), ..., f(x_n)) has a centered multi-normal distribution and whose distribution is invariant to shifts. Persistence is the event of such a random function to remain positive on a long interval [0,N].  Estimating the probability of this event has important implications in engineering , physics, and probability. However, though active efforts to understand persistence were made in the last 50 years, until recently, only specific examples and very general bounds were obtained. In the last few years, a new point of view simplifies the study of persistence, namely - relating it to the spectral measure of the process. In this talk we will use this point of view to study the persistence in cases where the spectral measure is 'small' or 'big' near zero. This talk is based on Joint work with Naomi Feldheim and Ohad Feldheim.
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Liran Rotem , University of Minnesota , lrotem@umn.edu , Organizer: Galyna Livshyts
In this talk we will discuss several ways to construct new convex bodies out of old ones. We will start by defining various methods of "averaging" convex bodies, both old and new. We will explain the relationships between the various definitions and their connections to basic conjectures in convex geometry. We will then discuss the power operation, and explain for example why every convex body has a square root, but not every convex body has a square. If time permits, we will briefly discuss more complicated constructions such as logarithms. The talk is based on joint work with Vitali Milman.
Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 005 , Dario Mena , Georgia Tech , Organizer: Shahaf Nitzan
 We impose standard $T1$-type assumptions on a Calderón-Zygmund operator $T$, and deduce that for bounded compactly supported functions $f,g$ there is a sparse bilinear form $\Lambda$ so that $$   |\langle T f, g \rangle | \lesssim \Lambda (f,g). $$ The proof is short and elementary. The sparse bound quickly implies all the standard mapping properties of a Calderón-Zygmund on a (weighted) $L^p$ space.  
Wednesday, March 1, 2017 - 14:05 , Location: Skiles 006 , Artem Zvavitch , Kent State University , zvavitch@math.kent.edu , Organizer: Galyna Livshyts
For a compact subset $A$ of $R^n$ , let $A(k)$ be the Minkowski sum of $k$ copies of $A$, scaled by $1/k$. It is well known that $A(k)$ approaches the convex hull of $A$ in Hausdorff distance as $k$ goes to infinity. A few years ago, Bobkov, Madiman and Wang conjectured that the volume of $A(k)$ is non-decreasing in $k$, or in other words, that when the volume deficit between the convex hull of $A$ and $A(k)$ goes to $0$, it actually does so monotonically. While this conjecture holds true in dimension $1$, we show that it fails in dimension $12$ or greater. Then we consider whether one can have monotonicity of convergence of $A(k)$ when its non-convexity is measured in alternate ways. Our main positive result is that Schneider’s index of non-convexity of $A(k)$ converges monotonically to $0$ as $k$ increases; even the convergence does not seem to have been known before.  We also obtain some results for the Hausdorff distance to the convex hull, along the way clarifying various properties of these notions of non-convexity that may be of independent interest.Joint work with Mokshay Madiman, Matthieu Fradelizi and Arnaud Marsiglietti.

Pages